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More Ships - Send the Eagle's Answer by James Daugherty 1918 - $500

More Ships - Send the Eagle's Answer by James Daugherty 1918 1 thumbnailMore Ships - Send the Eagle's Answer by James Daugherty 1918 2 thumbnailMore Ships - Send the Eagle's Answer by James Daugherty 1918 3 thumbnailMore Ships - Send the Eagle's Answer by James Daugherty 1918 4 thumbnail
condition: good
WW1 US propaganda / advertising poster. Soldiers with bayonets surge on towards enemy lines. This stunning work blends tropes of industrial power with early Modernist color schemes and compositions for a total effect that is awe-inspiring.

I also have another poster called "Nothing Stops These Men Let Nothing Stop You" by Howard Giles (1918) if you're interested in the pair.

Framed and measures 57" tall by 38.5" wide. Frame is slightly pulling on the top. I've pictured here. Its not noticeable without knowing it is there, but it's also easily repaired with a framer.

This is one of the most dramatic posters created in America during WWI. A bald eagle, that persistent symbol of American tenacity, soars towards the eastern sunrise with his talons out. As feathers fly, he leads the ships below towards the "war over there". It is a strong image encouraging higher production on the home front for battleships.

This poster from 1918 was commissioned by the Emergency Fleet Corporation (EFC). The EFC was founded in 1917 by the United States Shipping Board (USSB), which was established while the United States was at peace to try to restore the nation's Merchant Marine ship supply. After the entry of the U.S. into WWI, the function of the USSB changed radically, becoming a military agency that maintained the line of communication between America and Europe.

The artist of the poster, James Henry Daugherty (1889-1974), started his career studying in the Corcoran Gallery's Free School and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He then moved to Europe with his family and in London continued his artistic studies. After returning to the United States in 1907, Daugherty moved to New York City and worked as an illustrator. During WWI he got commissions from different US Government agencies to design propaganda posters and also worked in a camouflage unit and experimented with colors. During the 1920's, Daugherty began painting in a more realist style and was concentrated on murals. In addition to painting murals, Daugherty illustrated over fifty children's books. His works are part of collections at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

post id: 7745258585

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